Posts Tagged ‘over’

Amon Amarth – Doom Over Dead Man

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Doom Over Dead Man – Lyrics The autumn clouds are caving in And night comes crawling black as sin. Lightning strikes and rain begins, A storm that tears my soul. I toss and twizzle in my bed, My thoughts are spinning in my head. Darkness nears soon I’ll be dead; I’m losing all control. I spent my life in foolish quest For gold and riches I’d contest And now I’m left with just regrets, Too late to change my ways. My life it seems has slipped away, I leave no legacy to praise. Nothing more for me to say: My life has been a waste. When! When time has come for me to leave, When! When judgment’s passed upon my life, When! A cold dark grave awaits for me, Will! Will my name live endlessly? When! When time has come for me to leave, When! When judgment’s passed upon my life, When! A cold dark grave awaits for me, Will! Will my name live endlessly? So I die but won’t be mourned; Broken and alone. I wish that I were never born. So I die and won’t be missed, No rune stone will be raised As my body rots away. Die! All friends and cattle pass away Die! And death will come for every man! Die! But I know one thing never dies; Doom! The sentence passed upon the dead! Now! The time has come for me to leave Now! And judgment’s passed upon my life. Now! I will rest in my dark grave. Will! They speak my name with reverence? My life has been a waste! No rune stone will be raised! So I die, but won’t be mourned! I wish that I were never born! I rest here in my shallow grave! As my body, rots away!

Dew Tour – Andy Buckworth Attempts a Double Backflip Over the Spine – Las Vegas BMX Park Finals

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Check out Andy Buckworth’s 2nd run from the BMX Park finals at the Dew Tour Championships presented by GoDaddy.com in Las Vegas. After pulling a double backflip over the box, he attempts a 2nd doubleflip over the spine. Get more videos and articles from the Dew Tour Championships here: www.allisports.com BMX Park Final Results 1. Scotty Cranmer – 92.13 2. Dennis Enarson – 91.13 3. Daniel Dhers – 90.75 4. Brett Banasiewicz – 90.63 5. Kyle Baldock – 90.38 6. Mark Webb – 89.38 7. Garrett Reynolds – 87.88 8. Gary Young – 87.38 9. Patrick Casey – 87.25 10. Josh Harrington – 85.75 11. Andrew Buckworth – 85.38 12. Harry Main – 85.00 SUBSCRIBE to this channel for the latest highlights and top runs from every stop of the Dew Tour and Winter Dew Tour!
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Gary moore – over the hills and far away

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The original, later covered by nightwish. For the nightwish cover, go here www.youtube.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: South hangar panorama, including stunt planes (DHC-1A Chipmunk, Monocoupe 110 Special, etc) hanging over the Concorde, among others

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: South hangar panorama, including stunt planes (DHC-1A Chipmunk, Monocoupe 110 Special, etc) hanging over the Concorde, among others
heavy metal movie
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Monocoupe 110 Special:

Air show pilot and aerobatic champion W. W. "Woody" Edmondson thrilled audiences with his Monocoupe 110 Special throughout the 1940s. Edmondson, who named the airplane Little Butch for its bulldog-like appearance, placed second to "Bevo" Howard and his Bücker Jungmeister in the 1946 and ’47 American Aerobatic Championships, but he won the first International Aerobatic Championship in 1948.

The Monocoupe 110 Special was a clipped-wing version of the 110, part of a line that began with Don Luscombe’s Mono 22 and continued with the 70, 90, and 110 models. The sport coupes of the 1930s, these fast and maneuverable aircraft were ideal for racers Phoebe Omlie and Johnny Livingston. Ken Hyde of Warrenton, Virginia, restored Little Butch prior to its donation to the Smithsonian.

Gift of John J. McCulloch

Manufacturer:
Monocoupe Airplane Co.

Date:
1941

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 6.9 m (23 ft.)
Length: 6.2 m (20 ft. 4 in.)
Height: 2.1 m (6 ft. 11 in.)
Weight, empty: 449 kg (991 lbs.)
Weight, gross: 730 kg (1,611 lbs.)
Top speed: 313 km/h (195 mph)
Engine: Warner 185, 200 hp

Materials:
Fuselage: steel tube with fabric cover Physical Description:High-wing, 2-seat, 1940’s monoplane. Warner Super Scarab 185, 200hp engine. Red with white trim. Clipped wings.

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Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | De Havilland-Canada DHC-1A Chipmunk, Pennzoil Special:

De Havilland originally designed the Chipmunk after World War II as a primary trainer to replace the venerable Tiger Moth. Among the tens of thousands of pilots who trained in or flew the Chipmunk for pleasure was veteran aerobatic and movie pilot Art Scholl. He flew his Pennzoil Special at air shows throughout the 1970s and early ’80s, thrilling audiences with his skill and showmanship and proving that the design was a top-notch aerobatic aircraft.

Art Scholl purchased the DHC-1A in 1968. He modified it to a single-seat airplane with a shorter wingspan and larger vertical fin and rudder, and made other changes to improve its performance. Scholl was a three-time member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team, an air racer, and a movie and television stunt pilot. At air shows, he often flew with his dog Aileron on his shoulder or taxied with him standing on the wing.

Gift of the Estate of Arthur E. Scholl

Manufacturer:
De Havilland Canada Ltd.

Pilot:
Art Scholl

Date:
1946

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 9.4 m (31 ft)
Length: 7.9 m (26 ft)
Height: 2.1 m (7 ft 1 in)
Weight, empty: 717 kg (1,583 lb)
Weight, gross: 906 kg (2,000 lb)
Top speed: 265 km/h (165 mph)
Engine: Lycoming GO-435, 260 hp

Materials:
Overall: Aluminum Monocoque Physical Description:Single-engine monoplane. Lycoming GO-435, 260 hp engine.

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Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Concorde, Fox Alpha, Air France:

The first supersonic airliner to enter service, the Concorde flew thousands of passengers across the Atlantic at twice the speed of sound for over 25 years. Designed and built by Aérospatiale of France and the British Aviation Corporation, the graceful Concorde was a stunning technological achievement that could not overcome serious economic problems.

In 1976 Air France and British Airways jointly inaugurated Concorde service to destinations around the globe. Carrying up to 100 passengers in great comfort, the Concorde catered to first class passengers for whom speed was critical. It could cross the Atlantic in fewer than four hours – half the time of a conventional jet airliner. However its high operating costs resulted in very high fares that limited the number of passengers who could afford to fly it. These problems and a shrinking market eventually forced the reduction of service until all Concordes were retired in 2003.

In 1989, Air France signed a letter of agreement to donate a Concorde to the National Air and Space Museum upon the aircraft’s retirement. On June 12, 2003, Air France honored that agreement, donating Concorde F-BVFA to the Museum upon the completion of its last flight. This aircraft was the first Air France Concorde to open service to Rio de Janeiro, Washington, D.C., and New York and had flown 17,824 hours.

Gift of Air France.

Manufacturer:
Societe Nationale Industrielle Aerospatiale
British Aircraft Corporation

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 25.56 m (83 ft 10 in)
Length: 61.66 m (202 ft 3 in)
Height: 11.3 m (37 ft 1 in)
Weight, empty: 79,265 kg (174,750 lb)
Weight, gross: 181,435 kg (400,000 lb)
Top speed: 2,179 km/h (1350 mph)
Engine: Four Rolls-Royce/SNECMA Olympus 593 Mk 602, 17,259 kg (38,050 lb) thrust each
Manufacturer: Société Nationale Industrielle Aérospatiale, Paris, France, and British Aircraft Corporation, London, United Kingdom

Physical Description:
Aircaft Serial Number: 205. Including four (4) engines, bearing respectively the serial number: CBE066, CBE062, CBE086 and CBE085.
Also included, aircraft plaque: "AIR FRANCE Lorsque viendra le jour d’exposer Concorde dans un musee, la Smithsonian Institution a dores et deja choisi, pour le Musee de l’Air et de l’Espace de Washington, un appariel portant le couleurs d’Air France."

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Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing 367-80 Jet Transport:

On July 15, 1954, a graceful, swept-winged aircraft, bedecked in brown and yellow paint and powered by four revolutionary new engines first took to the sky above Seattle. Built by the Boeing Aircraft Company, the 367-80, better known as the Dash 80, would come to revolutionize commercial air transportation when its developed version entered service as the famous Boeing 707, America’s first jet airliner.

In the early 1950s, Boeing had begun to study the possibility of creating a jet-powered military transport and tanker to complement the new generation of Boeing jet bombers entering service with the U.S. Air Force. When the Air Force showed no interest, Boeing invested million of its own capital to build a prototype jet transport in a daring gamble that the airlines and the Air Force would buy it once the aircraft had flown and proven itself. As Boeing had done with the B-17, it risked the company on one roll of the dice and won.

Boeing engineers had initially based the jet transport on studies of improved designs of the Model 367, better known to the public as the C-97 piston-engined transport and aerial tanker. By the time Boeing progressed to the 80th iteration, the design bore no resemblance to the C-97 but, for security reasons, Boeing decided to let the jet project be known as the 367-80.

Work proceeded quickly after the formal start of the project on May 20, 1952. The 367-80 mated a large cabin based on the dimensions of the C-97 with the 35-degree swept-wing design based on the wings of the B-47 and B-52 but considerably stiffer and incorporating a pronounced dihedral. The wings were mounted low on the fuselage and incorporated high-speed and low-speed ailerons as well as a sophisticated flap and spoiler system. Four Pratt & Whitney JT3 turbojet engines, each producing 10,000 pounds of thrust, were mounted on struts beneath the wings.

Upon the Dash 80’s first flight on July 15, 1954, (the 34th anniversary of the founding of the Boeing Company) Boeing clearly had a winner. Flying 100 miles per hour faster than the de Havilland Comet and significantly larger, the new Boeing had a maximum range of more than 3,500 miles. As hoped, the Air Force bought 29 examples of the design as a tanker/transport after they convinced Boeing to widen the design by 12 inches. Satisfied, the Air Force designated it the KC-135A. A total of 732 KC-135s were built.

Quickly Boeing turned its attention to selling the airline industry on this new jet transport. Clearly the industry was impressed with the capabilities of the prototype 707 but never more so than at the Gold Cup hydroplane races held on Lake Washington in Seattle, in August 1955. During the festivities surrounding this event, Boeing had gathered many airline representatives to enjoy the competition and witness a fly past of the new Dash 80. To the audience’s intense delight and Boeing’s profound shock, test pilot Alvin "Tex" Johnston barrel-rolled the Dash 80 over the lake in full view of thousands of astonished spectators. Johnston vividly displayed the superior strength and performance of this new jet, readily convincing the airline industry to buy this new airliner.

In searching for a market, Boeing found a ready customer in Pan American Airway’s president Juan Trippe. Trippe had been spending much of his time searching for a suitable jet airliner to enable his pioneering company to maintain its leadership in international air travel. Working with Boeing, Trippe overcame Boeing’s resistance to widening the Dash-80 design, now known as the 707, to seat six passengers in each seat row rather than five. Trippe did so by placing an order with Boeing for 20 707s but also ordering 25 of Douglas’s competing DC-8, which had yet to fly but could accommodate six-abreast seating. At Pan Am’s insistence, the 707 was made four inches wider than the Dash 80 so that it could carry 160 passengers six-abreast. The wider fuselage developed for the 707 became the standard design for all of Boeing’s subsequent narrow-body airliners.

Although the British de Havilland D.H. 106 Comet and the Soviet Tupolev Tu-104 entered service earlier, the Boeing 707 and Douglas DC-8 were bigger, faster, had greater range, and were more profitable to fly. In October 1958 Pan American ushered the jet age into the United States when it opened international service with the Boeing 707 in October 1958. National Airlines inaugurated domestic jet service two months later using a 707-120 borrowed from Pan Am. American Airlines flew the first domestic 707 jet service with its own aircraft in January 1959. American set a new speed mark when it opened the first regularly-scheduled transcontinental jet service in 1959. Subsequent nonstop flights between New York and San Francisco took only 5 hours – 3 hours less than by the piston-engine DC-7. The one-way fare, including a surcharge for jet service, was 5.50, or 1 round trip. The flight was almost 40 percent faster and almost 25 percent cheaper than flying by piston-engine airliners. The consequent surge of traffic demand was substantial.

The 707 was originally designed for transcontinental or one-stop transatlantic range. But modified with extra fuel tanks and more efficient turbofan engines, the 707-300 Intercontinental series aircraft could fly nonstop across the Atlantic with full payload under any conditions. Boeing built 855 707s, of which 725 were bought by airlines worldwide.

Having launched the Boeing Company into the commercial jet age, the Dash 80 soldiered on as a highly successful experimental aircraft. Until its retirement in 1972, the Dash 80 tested numerous advanced systems, many of which were incorporated into later generations of jet transports. At one point, the Dash 80 carried three different engine types in its four nacelles. Serving as a test bed for the new 727, the Dash 80 was briefly equipped with a fifth engine mounted on the rear fuselage. Engineers also modified the wing in planform and contour to study the effects of different airfoil shapes. Numerous flap configurations were also fitted including a highly sophisticated system of "blown" flaps which redirected engine exhaust over the flaps to increase lift at low speeds. Fin height and horizontal stabilizer width was later increased and at one point, a special multiple wheel low pressure landing gear was fitted to test the feasibility of operating future heavy military transports from unprepared landing fields.

After a long and distinguished career, the Boeing 367-80 was finally retired and donated to the Smithsonian in 1972. At present, the aircraft is installated at the National Air and Space Museum’s new facility at Washington Dulles International Airport.

Gift of the Boeing Company

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.

Date:
1954

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Height 19′ 2": Length 73′ 10": Wing Span 129′ 8": Weight 33,279 lbs.

Physical Description:
Prototype Boeing 707; yellow and brown.

Mountain – Roll Over Beethoven

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Mountain perfoming Roll Over Beethoven from the 1971 LP Flowers Of Evil.I believe,until these days,that this is,to my opinion,the best cover of this Chuck Berry’s song.Over 35 years i have heard too many bands and so many guitar players but this cover is an amazing tribute to rock’n’roll from a hard rock band like Mountain.Leslie West was at that time,and in this particular live album,out of his limits on guitar.Felix Pappalardi on bass just knock’em all down by his unique bass sound.If you ever listen the whole LP you’ll understand what i’m saying.Respect to those that made music history.Enjoy !!! PS:Hoped to found some video from this historical moment but it was impossible.So enjoy only the sound of Mountain.This clip goes to all of you,to all lovers of guitar playing and to the new ages to learn something for big bands that left some treasures behind.Presented under fair use for educational purposes,materials all rights reserved by the original owners. THE USE OF ANY COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL IS USED UNDER THE GUIDELINES OF “FAIR USE” IN TITLE 17 & 107 OF THE UNITED STATES CODE. SUCH MATERIAL REMAINS THE COPYRIGHT OF THE ORIGINAL HOLDER AND IS USED HERE FOR THE PURPOSES OF EDUCATION, COMPARISON, AND CRITICISM ONLY. NO INFRINGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT IS INTENDED
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Five Finger Death Punch – Under and Over It

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Five Finger Death Punch performing ‘Under and Over It’ at Rock Hard at the Park 2011 at the Greyhound Events Center in Post Falls, ID. Check out more videos and pictures from the show: bit.ly
Video Rating: 5 / 5

XV Exclusive Freestyle for Hard Knock TV over Otis, The Official + More

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www.hardknock.tv XV Off the dome! There is no denying that this is a true freestyle! After a long day of shooting a music video for “Awesome” and then sitting down to talk to Nick Huff Barili for over an hour XV blessed us with a freestyle session. This is the essence of Hip Hop to me! Playing beats from a car, chilling on the corner, spitting whatever comes to mind. After working in the music industry for over a decade and dealing with a lot of artists that take themselves to seriously, it was refreshing to see XV just have fun with it! SQUARIANS Stand Up!!! We are just getting started, Nick Huff Barili talked to XV for an hour. Interview and Behind the Scenes of the making of “Awesome” music video coming next week! Make sure to subscribe to www.youtube.com for our latest videos! You can also follow us at www.facebook.com/hardknocktv and @Hardknocktv @NickHuff on twitter.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Lindsay and Joseph looking over the menu at the Hard Rock Cafe

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Lindsay and Joseph looking over the menu at the Hard Rock Cafe
new hard rock
Image by jpowers65

“Take Me Over” – (Magix Music Maker 17) – Rock Song – Realised By Paranoid Prophet

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This is One Of My Last Song I’ve Composed Using Magix Music Maker.;) Another an ElectroRock Song (I’ll Hope You Like It) Please if You Like This Tune So Subscribe Comment or Rate. Thanks Again For The Support 🙂
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Wave over Rocks 1 and 2

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Wave over Rocks 1 and 2
hard rock hits
Image by jkirkhart35
Frontal View of Rock 1 by the elephant seals during a stormy time. Notice the gull in the center that seems to have been blown off the rock when the wave hit it so hard.