Coast To Coast AM – 26.6.2011 – 1/4 – Rock Music & 1970

MP3 www.4shared.com Guests: David Browne, Major Ed Dames Rock Music & 1970: Many people point to 1969 as being a pivotal year for change. But Rolling Stone writer David Browne is more convinced that 1970 is the true culprit to the end of peace and love. He joined George Knapp on Sunday night to look at how 1970 changed the world through the stories of four rock and roll bands/musical artists– The Beatles, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (CSNY), Simon & Garfunkel, and James Taylor. The year 1970 saw a number of pivotal events like Kent State, when four student protestors were shot and killed by the National Guard. 1970 was also the year that both Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin died, and the Beatles, CSNY, and Simon & Garfunkel all broke up, Browne noted. He recounted the events leading up to the Beatles disbanding: They had just recorded Let it Be, and McCartney and Lennon were in disagreement over who should manage their business affairs. Then McCartney sent out a press release about his upcoming solo record, which was in conflict with the release date for Let it Be. McCartney’s record was delayed, angering him, and setting off a chain of repercussions that led to the break-up at the end of 1970. Simon & Garfunkel (whom a record exec. said had a name that sounded like either a comedy act or a department store) were at the height of their popularity with their hit song Bridge Over Troubled Water, when they decided to call it quits, said Browne. The super group CSNY had a lot

Ruby Coast

Ruby Coast
hard rock hits
Image by Nirazilla
Nikon D40 + 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G Nikkor @ The Basement.
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I almost got locked out of this show, which would have sucked because I had a great time. Getting there late (around 45 minutes after doors), I was told by the box office guy that I wasn’t on the guest list, which I should have been, as I completed a poster for the night’s show. I was able to get a hold of upper management by phone, who got me in. Relief.

Once inside, I was surprised to see that the place wasn’t packed as a sold out night would have usually indicated. It was odd. At Where’s The Band?, it was so packed I could barely move past the steps to get to the floor. Here I was able to saunter forward leisurely and still get a really good spot stage left, front row.

The first band on the bill was Ruby Coast, who had the whole room bopping immediately. One of the more memorable openers in my recent history, I think. Hard-hitting indie rock goodness with a pinch of self-deprecation and drenched in jumpy, driving beats. Check them out.

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Listening To: [Battles] – Atlas.
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