Posts Tagged ‘British’

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: British Hawker Hurricane, with P-38 Lightning and B-29 Enola Gay behind it

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: British Hawker Hurricane, with P-38 Lightning and B-29 Enola Gay behind it
heavy metal movie
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIC:

Hawker Chief Designer Sydney Camm’s Hurricane ranks with the most important aircraft designs in military aviation history. Designed in the late 1930s, when monoplanes were considered unstable and too radical to be successful, the Hurricane was the first British monoplane fighter and the first British fighter to exceed 483 kilometers (300 miles) per hour in level flight. Hurricane pilots fought the Luftwaffe and helped win the Battle of Britain in the summer of 1940.

This Mark IIC was built at the Langley factory, near what is now Heathrow Airport, early in 1944. It served as a training aircraft during the World War II in the Royal Air Force’s 41 OTU.

Donated by the Royal Air Force Museum

Manufacturer:
Hawker Aircraft Ltd.

Date:
1944

Country of Origin:
United Kingdom

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 12.2 m (40 ft)
Length: 9.8 m (32 ft 3 in)
Height: 4 m (13 ft)
Weight, empty: 2,624 kg (5,785 lb)
Weight, gross: 3,951 kg (8,710 lb)
Top speed:538 km/h (334 mph)
Engine:Rolls-Royce Merlin XX, liquid-cooled in-line V, 1,300 hp
Armament:four 20 mm Hispano cannons
Ordnance:two 250-lb or two 500-lb bombs or eight 3-in rockets

Materials:
Fuselage: Steel tube with aircraft spruce forms and fabric, aluminum cowling
Wings: Stressed Skin Aluminum
Horizontal Stablizer: Stress Skin aluminum
Rudder: fabric covered aluminum
Control Surfaces: fabric covered aluminum

Physical Description:
Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIC single seat, low wing monoplane ground attack fighter; enclosed cockpit; steel tube fuselage with aircraft spruce forms and fabric, aluminum cowling, stressed skin aluminum wings and horizontal stablizer, fabric covered aluminum rudder and control surfaces; grey green camoflage top surface paint scheme with dove grey underside; red and blue national roundel on upper wing surface and red, white, and blue roundel lower wing surface; red, white, blue, and yellow roundel fuselage sides; red, white and blue tail flash; Rolls-Royce Merlin XX, liquid cooled V-12, 1,280 horsepower engine; Armament, 4: 20mm Hispano cannons.

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Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing B-29 Superfortress "Enola Gay":

Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress was the most sophisticated propeller-driven bomber of World War II and the first bomber to house its crew in pressurized compartments. Although designed to fight in the European theater, the B-29 found its niche on the other side of the globe. In the Pacific, B-29s delivered a variety of aerial weapons: conventional bombs, incendiary bombs, mines, and two nuclear weapons.

On August 6, 1945, this Martin-built B-29-45-MO dropped the first atomic weapon used in combat on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later, Bockscar (on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum near Dayton, Ohio) dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. Enola Gay flew as the advance weather reconnaissance aircraft that day. A third B-29, The Great Artiste, flew as an observation aircraft on both missions.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.
Martin Co., Omaha, Nebr.

Date:
1945

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 900 x 3020cm, 32580kg, 4300cm (29ft 6 5/16in. x 99ft 1in., 71825.9lb., 141ft 15/16in.)

Materials:
Polished overall aluminum finish

Physical Description:
Four-engine heavy bomber with semi-monoqoque fuselage and high-aspect ratio wings. Polished aluminum finish overall, standard late-World War II Army Air Forces insignia on wings and aft fuselage and serial number on vertical fin; 509th Composite Group markings painted in black; "Enola Gay" in black, block letters on lower left nose.

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Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed P-38J-10-LO Lightning:

In the P-38 Lockheed engineer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson and his team of designers created one of the most successful twin-engine fighters ever flown by any nation. From 1942 to 1945, U. S. Army Air Forces pilots flew P-38s over Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific, and from the frozen Aleutian Islands to the sun-baked deserts of North Africa. Lightning pilots in the Pacific theater downed more Japanese aircraft than pilots flying any other Allied warplane.

Maj. Richard I. Bong, America’s leading fighter ace, flew this P-38J-10-LO on April 16, 1945, at Wright Field, Ohio, to evaluate an experimental method of interconnecting the movement of the throttle and propeller control levers. However, his right engine exploded in flight before he could conduct the experiment.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Company

Date:
1943

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 390 x 1170cm, 6345kg, 1580cm (12ft 9 9/16in. x 38ft 4 5/8in., 13988.2lb., 51ft 10 1/16in.)

Materials:
All-metal

Physical Description:
Twin-tail boom and twin-engine fighter; tricycle landing gear.

Where are they now? – British rock and roll group – Johnny Kidd & The Pirates

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Where are they now? – British rock and roll group – Johnny Kidd & The Pirates
rock music
Image by brizzle born and bred
Johnny Kidd & The Pirates were a British rock and roll group led by singer/songwriter Johnny Kidd.

They scored a few hit songs from the late 1950s to the late 1960s, and are remembered for appearing onstage in pirate costumes, complete with eye-patches. Though sometimes dismissed as a novelty act because of this gimmick, critic Bruce Eder describes the band as "underrated."

The original group was signed to HMV in 1959 under the auspices of Walter J. Ridley. Their first single was the raw "Please Don’t Touch". This became a minor hit reaching number 25 on the UK singles charts in 1959. The song has since been covered many times, most successfully by the team of Motörhead and Girlschool known as Headgirl.

After this initial success the band was reorganised to streamline the sound and visual appeal. Kidd would naturally take centre-stage at the front, but with Clem Cattini (drums) directly behind. Flanking Kidd on either side would be Alan Caddy (guitar) and Brian Gregg (born 31 January 1939, in London) (bass); and Kidd would high-kick in time to the beat. In an attempt to re-create the feel of his recordings Kidd employed the use of an echo unit on his vocals, one of the first UK rock acts to attempt this on stage.

Singles
"Please Don’t Touch"/"Growl" (May 1959)
"If You Were the Only Girl in the World"/"Feelin’" (1959)
"You Got What It Takes"/"Longin’ Lips" (1960)
"Shakin’ All Over"/"Yes Sir, That’s My Baby" (June 1960)
"Restless"/"Magic of Love" (September 1960)
"Linda Lu"/"Let’s Talk About Us" (March 1961)
"Please Don’t Bring Me Down"/"So What" (September 1961)
"Hurry On Back To Love"/"I Want That" (January 1962)
"A Shot of Rhythm and Blues" b/w "I Can Tell" (November 1962)
"I’ll Never Get Over You"/"Then I Got Everything" (June 1963)
"Hungry For Love"/"Ecstasy" (November 1963)
"Always and Ever"/"Dr. Feelgood" (April 1964)
"Jealous Girl"/"Shop Around" (June 1964)
"Whole Lotta Woman"/"Your Cheatin’ Heart" (October 1964)
"The Birds and the Bees"/"Don’t Make the Same Mistake I Did" (February 1965)
"Shakin’ All Over ’65"/"I Gotta Travel On" (May 1965)
"It’s Gotta Be You"/"I Hate To Get Up In The Morning" (April 1966)
"The Fool"/"Send For That Girl" (posthumously) (November 1966)

Kidd and the Pirates’ finest moment might have been the powerful song "Shakin’ All Over", which features memorable opening guitars and solo from Joe Moretti, (who also featured on the follow up "Restless"), and reached number one in the UK singles charts in 1960. The song and the group’s proto-power trio line-up both made a strong impression on The Who, who would cover it in their 1970 album Live at Leeds, whose CD liner notes proclaim the original to be the UK’s best pre-Beatles rock single. Music critics Roy Carr and Tony Tyler would later write that "Shakin’ All Over" was the second-ever genuine British rock classic, following Cliff Richard’s "Move It".

The distinctive ‘Shakin’ effect on the track, was created by Joe Moretti sliding Brian Gregg’s cigarette lighter very fast up and down the guitar strings.

Frederick Heath, known as Johnny Kidd (23 December 1935 – 7 October 1966) was the front man for the rock band, Johnny Kidd and the Pirates. He was one of the few pre-Beatles British rock and rollers to achieve worldwide fame.

Kidd’s most famous song as a composer was "Shakin’ All Over", which was a #1 UK hit for the band in 1960. Kidd’s own version didn’t chart outside of Europe, but two cover versions did: The Guess Who topped the Canadian charts (and hit #22 US) with their 1965 version of "Shakin’ All Over", and in Australia, Normie Rowe topped the charts with it later the same year.

"Shakin’ All Over" was also covered by The Who on the classic Live at Leeds album. Iggy Pop also included it on his solo album "Avenue B".

Heath was born in 1935 in Willesden, North London, and died aged 30 in 1966, in a motor car accident near Bury, Lancashire.

His date of birth is alternatively listed as 1939 in some sources.

Kidd was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London.

Video – Johnny Kidd & The Pirates – Jealous Girl

www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8HMOiGfuGg